Astronomy Dates Biblical Events

Validity of Astronomical Dating

The Year of Jubilee

Evidence of The Resurrection

Experiences With God

Archangel Gabriel
Daniel vs. Muhammad


Elephantine Papyri
...Solar Eclipse


Beyond 2005

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"Spiritual Technology"
Astronomical Dating the Crucifixion

I have derived three "time-oriented" models from the Bible using astronomy to pinpoint the day Jesus died. Let's summarize the three models by stating the crucifixion occurred:

  1. On Friday
  2. In the years AD 31, 32 or 33
  3. A full moon must occur between 24 to 72 hours after the crucifixion (i.e. on Saturday, Sunday or Monday).

Models (A) and (C) above are critical to fixing the exact date of the crucifixion with astronomical data. Both models require that we find a lunar alignment with the full moon occurring on a Saturday, Sunday or Monday.

Since Daniel's time line points to AD 32, I will begin by depicting AD 32 as follows:

Viewing the graph above, we see a darkened circle on the right side in the Monday column depicting the full moon. The full moon occurred on Monday, April 14, at 12:06 p.m., which is shown in the far right column. Crosses appear before the full moon by 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours.

Friday's column has a cross. Months and years with a cross in the Friday column are viable choices for the crucifixion. Of course, months and years without a cross in the Friday column are eliminated as crucifixion candidates. I have shaded the Friday column to enhance the Friday requirement.

The year AD 32 meets all the conditions above. Jesus died on a Friday in either AD 31, 32, or 33. The full moon occurred on Monday, three days after the crucifixion.
 

Astronomical Data

Passover, in the first century, almost always occurred from March 15 to April 21. However, considering all possible options, I will analyze lunar cycles from March 1 through May 1. The following tables present lunar cycles for the years AD 29 through 34.

Viewing the graph for AD 29, a cross appears in the Friday column showing one possible date for the crucifixion on April 15. In this case, the full moon occurred on Sunday, April 17, two days after Friday. Yet, AD 29 is not a good choice for the year of the crucifixion based on the historic setting in the gospels of Luke and John (AD 31 to 33).

Since there are no crosses in the Friday column above, AD 30 is not a viable year for the crucifixion.

Roman Catholics generally select April 7, AD 30, as the date of the crucifixion based on the scholarly assumption that Jesus died on a Friday with a full moon. Yet, AD 30 does not match any of the criteria. Jesus had to die on a Friday with a full moon occurring on either Saturday, Sunday, or Monday. Moreover, AD 30 does not match the historic setting found in Luke and John for the years AD 31, 32, or 33.

Since there are no crosses in the Friday column above, AD 31 is not a viable year for the crucifixion. The year AD 31 does fit the historic setting found in Luke and John (AD 31, 32, or 33). However, AD 31 does not match a Friday crucifixion date with a full moon on Saturday, Sunday, or Monday.

Two lunar dates for the crucifixion emerge for the year AD 32. A full moon occurred on Saturday, March 15. The crucifixion would have been too early in the springtime on Friday, March 14. The second choice of April 11 meets all the criteria.

Viewing the graph for AD 33, the only possible choice, though not a good one, is for May 1. The full moon occurred on Sunday, May 3. May 1 is a poor choice because it is very late in the spring.

Many theologians and church historians have picked the April 3 date because a full moon occurred on Friday. Early April is the perfect setting for the Passover. Yet, there is no cross in the Friday column with a full moon alignment on Saturday, Sunday, or Monday.

Astronomy shows that a lunar eclipse occurred on Friday, April 3. However, a lunar eclipse offers no viable scenario for the crucifixion on April 3 since the sun had to be darkened, not the moon.

Again, since there are no crosses in the Friday column above, AD 34 is not a viable year for the crucifixion.
 

Summary of Lunar Data

Astronomical analysis shows there are four possible lunar dates for the crucifixion. Two of these dates, March 14, AD 32 and May 1, AD 33, fall outside the March 15 to April 21 limits for the Passover in the first century. Eliminating these two dates leaves only two possible lunar dates for the crucifixion as follows:

The first candidate in AD 29 does not fit the historic setting found in Luke and John (AD 31, 32, or 33). Only the AD 32 date survives. Astronomy supports Daniel's prophecy with impressive accuracy, showing divine revelation.
 

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